Announcing the Students Against Child Marriage Blog

You could say it’s been a busy month for Students Against Child Marriage. The four weeks since our launch have been jam-packed with organizing and coalition-building so that we can make the biggest impact possible in the child marriage reform movement.


Between initiating our conversations with lawmakers and key stakeholders across the 10 states in our Strategic Plan and launching our first fifteen chapters, we’re moving full speed ahead in our plan to raise awareness, take action, and create sweeping, lifesaving change.


With so much going on, it can be hard to stay up-to-date with our activities. What’s more, it can be hard to even understand American child marriage and why it occurs in the first place. Hey, it took me over two years of research to get here!


That’s why we’re thrilled to announce the Students Against Child Marriage blog. You have questions about underage marriage. We have the answers!


My team and I started Students Against Child Marriage to tap into the millions of college and high school students around the nation. Over the past month, we’ve assembled a team of talented young writers from across the country who will author blogs to keep you informed in this crucial fight.


Whether it’s exploring the reasons why the United States has a child marriage crisis and taking deep, explanatory dives into otherwise dense scholarship and research on underage marriage, or having conversations with child marriage survivors, experts, and advocates—in addition to our own team members—keeping up with our blog will make you just as much of an expert, too.


So, how can you follow along? If you’re a student and want to be a direct part of this fight, start a chapter at your school here. And if you just want to stay informed and read along, click here and sign-up for regular blog updates by making an account!


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Thank you to everyone who donated money, shared information, and helped us all get one step closer to ending child marriage in the U.S.